Ten Trends at Learning@School09

The Learning@School conference is rollicking along in Rotorua at the moment, with keynote speaker on day one, Andy Hargreaves, setting the scene with challenges to us all about the need to take account of the whole context and culture of our school when considering change and development. Pam Hook had the audience spell-bond also with her “Hooked on Thinking” ideas and strategies.

Unfortunately for me I am missing the conference, and have had to rely on my Twitter feeds, text messages and the odd call to keep me posted. Having made it to the opening of the conference I’ve had to return home for family reasons. That didn’t stop the presentation I was scheduled to do from going ahead – with my colleague from the Ministry of Education, Douglas Harre, stepping up to share thoughts, insights and ideas based on CORE’s Ten Trends for 2009. This is the annual list of trends developed by CORE staff to represent a view of some key areas of interest for NZ educators with regards to the impact of ICTs on teaching and learning.

This year’s trends are:

  1. Mobile Technologies for learning
  2. Netbooks
  3. Cloud Computing
  4. Learning spaces/environments
  5. Open Education Resources
  6. High Definition Video conferencing
  7. Advanced Networks
  8. Cyber-Citizenary
  9. Green computing
  10. Digital Literacy

The slideshow used at Learning@School is provided here:

For links to other research and lists of trends and predictions for 2009 check out the following:

Horizon Report, 2009

Looking forward to 2009

100 Top Sites for the year ahead

The Future of the Internet III

Horizon report – Australia/NZ edition

5 thoughts on “Ten Trends at Learning@School09

  1. It looks like you put a lot of work into your presentation. It’s a shame you weren’t there to present it. We missed you. Hope that all is on the mend now.

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  2. Trends from 2008
    Hi Derek,
    I always enjoy reading CORE’s and other writers forecasts re ‘top trends’ for education. I have a tendency to quickly think about what implications these trends have for my work in schools particularly in terms of informing strategic planning.
    Before I jumped into this ‘next action’ thinking I decided to examine the 2008 CORE trends to see how these had panned out and how these trends compared to those for this year.(i put them in a table but sorry it wouldn’t fit in this box)

    I looked at the 2008 list and thought about my workplace and the gains (or otherwise) we had made in relation to each trend. A worth-while exercise and one that generated a lot of thought about why our organisation embraced or otherwise a specific trend.
    I would be interested in your thoughts re progress towards the 2008 trends.
    I was also interested to see that 70% of the 2009 predictions were pretty much in line with those of 2008. Those from 2009 that seemed most distinct from 2008 included: Netbooks, High Definition Video conferencing and Cyber-Citizenary. I guess if I had listened to the accompanying presentation I would be aware of the more subtle changes within each trend.
    Can anything be gleamed from such a comparison? Is rate of change much, much slower than expected? What are the common barriers to shifts towards these trends?
    I was surprised that the accountability trend (from o8) didn’t feature in the 09 ‘line-up’ particularly in light of the emphasis on evidence, ‘teaching as inquiry’ in the New Zealand Curriculum, 2007.
    Thanks Derek for once again challenging my thinking. I look forward to further discussion around these trends and how they can impact on our work.

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  3. Unfortunately for me I am missing the conference, and have had to rely on my Twitter feeds, text messages and the odd call to keep me posted. Having made it to the opening of the conference I’ve had to return home for family reasons.

    Like

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