iPads in Education

The iPad is certainly attracting interest in the education scene, with lots of questions being asked about it’s use and value etc. Graham Brown-Martin shared the following post tonight on BECTA’s ICT research network list in response to a question about the pros and cons of buying iPads for use in school;

You may be interested in joining the Handheld Learning Community & Forum that has been online for over 5 years now and has a membership of more than 2,000 practitioners who have an active interest in using mobile computing technologies, including iPads, within their teaching practice:
http://www.handheldlearning.org

An article about the iPad in education that may be of interest:
http://www.handheldlearning.co.uk/content/view/64/
Specifically this article makes the case that the desktop PC is dead and that laptops are “on death row”.

There’s a community thread about the use of iPads in schools that practitioners are now contributing to:
http://www.handheldlearning.co.uk/component/option,com_smf/Itemid,58/topic,1693.0

There is also a professional networking group on LinkedIn.com for those interested in using mobile technologies for learning:
http://www.linkedin.com/groupRegistration?gid=137892

If you Twitter there is a channel for Handheld Learning at:
http://twitter.com/hhl

Finally you may be interest in attending this years Handheld Learning Festival & Conference in London this October:
http://www.handheldlearning2010.com
The event is FREE to attend on the first day and delegates registering for the conference receive a FREE iPad.

Thanks to Graham for these links – I’m sure we’re going to see lots more research and papers on this topic in the near future!

POST SCRIPT (added 7.6.10)

Entry from Jakob Nielsen’sAlertbox, May 10, 2010: iPad Usability: First Findings From User Testing provides an interesting use case perspective on the iPad in education. The summary reads:

iPad apps are inconsistent and have low feature discoverability, with frequent user errors due to accidental gestures. An overly strong print metaphor and weird interaction styles cause further usability problems.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s